Audio Drama

Something Incredible from Preproduction

Something Incredible from Preproduction

“Be good. Be kind…” Turn every story you love into a creative project.

At least that’s what I have discovered since I started streaming tabletop roleplaying games weekly and, one by one, falling in love with casts, characters, and stories. One stream stands to become a novel, one a roleplaying game setting, but the first stream I ever played? That’s becoming a podcast.

Moonbase Theta, Out: Broadcasts From Not-So-Far-Away

Moonbase Theta, Out: Broadcasts From Not-So-Far-Away

In the world of science-fiction, it’s rare that a countdown can be comforting. While the slowly descending count around which Moonbase Theta, Out is centered is far from benevolent, there’s a certain security to the plodding clock, as Communications Officer Roger Bragado-Fischer takes you through the seemingly mundane updates of life on Moonbase Theta. 

You, Me, and a Podcast

You, Me, and a Podcast

At a very early age, I knew I wanted to be a storyteller. I wrote my first story when I was five. In elementary school, it was all about writing short stories. In middle school, it became about poetry and novels. In high school, I moved on to writing and producing stage plays and screenplays. And that stayed with me through college and into adulthood—the visual form of storytelling became my absolute passion.

And then I fell into podcasting.

Audio Drama and the Art of the Invisible Wall

Audio Drama and the Art of the Invisible Wall

The idea of the fourth wall in theatre is a result, in part, of the writing of 18th century French critic and philosopher Denis Diderot - and the contribution his writing made to the rise of theatrical realism. Diderot advocated for a more natural style of acting - as if real events were happening in front of an audience that could be observed through a transparent fourth wall of the room in which they’re taking place. This notion led to the more ‘traditional’ set up of Western theatre we’re used to now - in which the fancifully termed proscenium arch is the frame through which a play is often observed, and there’s a clearly defined stage area emphasized by things like curtains and lighting.